Bond Songs Ranking Die zehn beliebtesten Bond-Songs

Ranking: Alle James-Bond-Songs inklusive Billie Eilishs „No Time To Die“. Ranking: ALLE Bond-Songs – von grauenhaft bis hammergut. Wir sagen euch, welches die besten – und die schlechtesten. Weitere nominierte Titelsongs folgten, aber erst Skyfall aus dem Jahr wurde mit dem Preis ausgezeichnet. Gesondert aufgeführt sind die Titellieder der Filme​. James-Bond: Von Hörsturz bis Ohrwurm – die Top 30 der Songs haben uns letztendlich aber für einen Platz in der Mitte des Rankings. Von Billie Eilish bis Shirley Bassey: Diese Mission hätte selbst James Bond verzweifeln lassen, doch wir haben die 24 Songs treffsicher platziert.

Bond Songs Ranking

Über die Jahrzehnte haben schon viele Künstler die Titelsongs der "James Bond​"-Reihe singen dürfen. Einige Bond-Songs wurden große Hits. Von Billie Eilish bis Shirley Bassey: Diese Mission hätte selbst James Bond verzweifeln lassen, doch wir haben die 24 Songs treffsicher platziert. Sam Smith dürfte es mit seinem Song zu "Spectre" schwer haben, die Top10 der besten Bond-Songs zu knacken, die Konkurrenz ist einfach zu groß. CINEMA. Bond Songs Ranking Silberrücken Link zum Artikel 3. James Bond in neuer Mission - und Daniel Craig ebenso: nach dem letzten Bond Film "Ein Quantum Trost" der von den meisten Zuschauern gnadenlos zerrissen Kong Bewertung hängt es Manchester Leicester von diesem hier ab ob die Reihe überhaupt noch mal erfolgreich fortgeführt werden kann. Die hier verlinkte Version klingt Beste Spielothek in Ringelberg finden ein wenig flach, in bessere Qualität merkt man absolut, wie viel hier eigentlich in knapp 4 Minuten passiert. Nobody Does It Better. Habe bei einigen Songs die Interpreten gar nicht gekannt. Für dieses Auto gibt Ronaldo 9,5 Millionen Euro aus. Widmer John Barry, Duran Duran. Tatsächlich Online BГ¶rsen wohl keiner die tragische Szene je vergessen können, ebenso wenig wie den dazugehörigen Song.

Instead of offering a memorable Bond song, we got what sounds like a forgettable track from a late '90s grunge rock compilation of theme song covers.

Tom Jones seems like the perfect vocalist for a James Bond tune. Coming ofnthe heels of 's Goldfinger which introduced the opening credits song, sung by Shirley Bassey , Thunderball put another Welsh singer—this time a man—behind the mic.

But it simply sounds like a rehash of its predecessor, an unremarkable ballad about a man who strikes "like thunderball," which doesn't actually make any sense.

Lulu's pop stylings made her a blue-eyed soul icon, and her biggest hits are peppy and vibrant. This theme song, however, is clunky, jarring, and ultimately pretty stupid.

Maybe Madonna should have had her shot at a James Bond tune when she was an up-and-coming '80s pop star. It's Autotuned to hell, and actually has the singer inexplicably purring, "Sigmund Freud: Analyze this.

Don't you sort of wish David Bowie had recorded a James Bond theme? I get the feeling that the Bond producers had the same dream, but they couldn't book him for the gig and instead got Here's another song in the catalog that takes all of the Bond cliches: big orchestra with swooning strings, a catchy tempo, and a big and bold vocal performance from Shirley Bassey.

This particular combo, however, is mostly unremarkable. From the most recent film in the series, the generally mediocre Spectre , Sam Smith's Oscar-winning tune is, well, just fine.

It really just sounds like a sad Sam Smith ballad. From Russia With Love is the second James Bond movie, and the first with an original song composed for the credits—although the opening credits went with a short acoustic rendition, with Matt Monro's vocal track playing over the end credits.

It's a nice song, but not a standout. Is it good? Yeah, I suppose. Years later, it feels like the song is overpowered by Adele herself, who at the time was coasting on the success of her record-breaking album Look, I get that it's fun and dancey and very Duran Duran, but I still have to say it's a missed opportunity not having A View to a Kill co-star Grace Jones singing this one.

Sheryl Crow is certainly an odd choice for a Bond song, especially since it doesn't really capture her general vibe as a solo artist the dripping strings do, however, bring to mind Bobbie Genty's "Ode to Billie Joe," a song Crow later covered.

But she nails the sultry vocals with a particularly '90s ennui. You get the sense that Crow doesn't really care either way what happens tomorrow.

Sure, it has all of the trappings of a treacly '80s love song the production is bloated with keyboards and backing vocals , but Knight still makes it sexy—and the video proves she can pull of a tux pretty well.

Jack White and Alicia Keyes's duet is the only two-hander in the film franchise, and the Quantum of Solace theme is one of the good true rock songs in the Bond catalog.

It's a great mix of White's goth-adjacent rock and Keyes's soulful voice. It works a lot better in practice than one would expect, but it's not exactly the most memorable Bond tune.

Garbage frontwoman Shirley Manson has the perfect voice for a Bond song, and "The World Is Not Enough" is one of the better-case scenarios when it comes to blending the typical Bond vibe with a rock band.

It's unfortunate, however, that—much like the film it represents—it's not exactly a standout in the franchise. Tina Turner is a perfect choice for a bond theme song, and this one that accompanied Pierce Brosnan's debut as is slinky and sexy and reminiscent of Shirley Bassey's three songs.

While Turner's vocals aren't as powerful as Bassey's, her instrument blends well with the big orchestrations. And that it's both reminiscent of a classic Bond tune while also standing out as a '90s sex jam makes it the perfect combination.

There's a reason this one feels like an outlier among the other Bond tunes: While it was written by Bond composer John Barry, it wasn't used in the opening credits of On Her Majesty's Secret Service —which is often the most overlooked Bond film since it's the only one that starred actor George Lazenby.

This song feels more like a standard than any of the rest thanks to Louis Armstrong's iconic vocals. This might be a controversial placement, but I stand by it.

The theme from Octopussy —which, for understandable reasons, does not share a title with the film—is classic AM Gold and a bona fide smooth pop hit.

It might be the most anti-James Bond theme song in the entire franchise, which serves this track well. Diamonds Are Forever might be best known for being Sean Connery's final film in the Eon-produced films he'd return in 's Never Say Never Again , a sort-of remake of Thunderball , it also served as Shirley Bassey's second outing as a Bond theme song singer.

While it's better than "Moonraker" and less iconic than "Goldfinger," this one is an earworm that will likely not leave your head any time soon.

Tina Turner totally makes sense for a Bond theme, and she oozes nostalgia for the film's original era on this cut for Pierce Brosnan's debut as But the song never really There's no big finish to latch on to, no earworm chorus that digs in and has you humming long after you've finished.

It's also corny as hell. This also loses points because it sounds like a sorta-good Duran Duran song that just happened to be placed in a James Bond movie, as opposed to something that stretched the band to be more creative.

This attempt by the venerable Welsh belter fits the mold of a Bond theme, with blaring horns and minor-key, lounge singer panache.

It's simply unremarkable—not terrible, not great, ultimately forgettable when compared to other songs from this early Bond era.

People love this jawn, and it's a staple on easy listening radio stations. And don't get me wrong, it's a serviceable love song.

But where's the danger? The intrigue? The sex? All I can think of when I listen to "All Time High" is those erectile dysfunction commercials where two Boomers hold hands in separate outdoor bathtubs while admiring a Sonoma sunset.

It just does nothing to prep me for a secret agent movie that's about to go down. Any Bond theme that prominently features smooth saxophone over a saucy trumpet is making a choice —and it's the wrong one.

It tugs at the heartstrings, is dynamically interesting, and is elegantly produced. It's just not a Bond song! It's too happy, too sweet, too major-key.

James Bond doesn't drive across country smiling to AM radio—he's over the legal limit and being pursued by some ridiculous foe.

If a Bond theme song could function as a first dance song at a wedding, it's not really a Bond theme song. The good parts about this song?

It's gauzy, a clear throwback to classic Bond ballads. Sam Smith is adequately brooding to deliver it. It's got a not-bad chorus.

The bad part? It's boring! At best, it's an ersatz "Skyfall. Shirley Bassey is the Queen of Bond theme songs, with several entries on this list.

This is the worst of those entries. Not awful, but easily the least memorable of her contributions to the Bond pantheon. There's more rock 'n' roll swagger in this duet than the Bond franchise is accustomed.

And that's okay! It's a clear example of two artists honoring the Bond motif and applying their own stylistic spin.

But it lacks the gravitas and drama of the best theme songs. It's way better as an end credits song than an opening credits song.

The sensuality of Sheryl Crow's Bond theme vaults it to the middle-of-the-pack. But Crow is an odd choice as more of a pop singer-songwriter rather than a belter or crooner and it's hard to get past that.

Casino Royale is an excellent Bond film, and the first one featuring Daniel Craig. Perhaps to announce a grittier , the late Chris Cornell was brought things into grunge things up.

It's a polarizing song: extremely true to Cornell's instincts as an artist coupled with Bondian horn blasts, but maybe too Buzz Cuts for diehard Bond-lovers.

I love the ambition of asking Cornell, one of the best rock voices of his generation, to perform a Bond song, even if it didn't result in a home run.

The synthy horns definitely date "License to Kill," which sits on the slow-jammy side of the Bond theme song spectrum.

As much as we think of JB as an elite assassin and secret agent, he's also a bonafide loverman! Shirley Manson singing in a Bond movie?

I'll take it. An entirely serviceable, if not world-conquering entry by the '90s rockers. Billie Eilish scares me and I think she's supposed to.

And while she's enigmatic and talented and probably going to get even bigger than she is right now, the most interesting parts of her debut album were the meshing of her voice and strange, engrossing production.

Asking her to sing a more conventional ballad over an orchestra is a treat in terms of stretching her artistic skill set. However, it sounds more like Billie is constraining herself to Bond World than Bond World is adjusting itself to Billie, which would've probably resulted in a more memorable song.

If you weren't paying attention, you might think Frank Sinatra is crooning this classic. This lush ballad suits Sean Connery's Bond exceptionally well, and effectively transports the listener back to the original era.

Monro's voice is front-and-center, allowing it to really soar over the orchestra serving as a sonic foundation. This song gets high placement for the simple fact that if you were to tell me, "Hey, Louis Armstrong did a Bond song," my assumption is that it would be very, very bad.

Don't get me wrong—Armstrong is a legend. But dark melodrama isn't his lane. That he doesn't lean into Bond musical tropes and still manages to turnaround a song that works within the franchise while simultaneously being enjoyable in and of itself is an achievement, and a tribute to Armstrong's enduring brilliance.

That voice! One of the most decadent Bond songs—and it's not even Bassey's best Bond song. Bow down. The build-up to the chorus makes me want to pump my fist in the air and crush some air drums.

Yes, it's not as shadowy as the rest of the Bond catalog, but who cares? Radiohead is such a slam-dunk choice for a Bond theme song that History will not look kindly on that choice, but Radiohead's exclusion makes their dejected theme that much more powerful.

Do your best not to get lost in the dour piano, the enveloping strings, and Thom Yorke's pristine falsetto.

Perhaps it was too interesting to be a Bond song! That opening string motif is just so of-the-times. Coupled with strummed acoustic guitar and an electric guitar playing that same opening string melody, Nancy Sinatra's Bond song takes you right back to the Swinging '60s.

Bond Songs Ranking Video

Top 10 Rejected Bond Theme Songs

Bond Songs Ranking Inhaltsverzeichnis

Pures Gold. Immerhin: Das Musikvideo ist besser als der gesamte Film und bleibt auch wesentlich besser in Erinnerung. Derart wichtig ist Shirley Merkur-Tricks.De App für das Bond-Franchise, dass Creditelo drei oder vier — je nach Zählart; siehe Infobox zuunterst Mal den Titelsong liefern durfte. Auf Platz neun geht Fuusball golden weiter: Geschrieben von Stammkomponist John Barry und eingesungen von Powerstimme Shirley Bassey 78 ist die Titelmelodie von "Goldfinger" Kaufen Spanisch so etwas wie der Inbegriff des Bond-Songs. Sophie Della. Dresscode: Maleficent zur Schlafenszeit. Natürlich Eines der besten imo. Sam's voice is hauntingly brilliant as ever, though. Beste Spielothek in Frittlingen finden - Continue Reading Below. This is definitely the most deeply odd Bond theme ever written and, in a weird way, that also makes it quite admirable, despite the quite vociferous critical reception it was given on release. An old school take on a Bond theme, it describes the plot of the movie without delving into the innuendo nature of later tunes. However, it sounds more like Billie is constraining herself to Bond World than Bond Die Besten Apps 2020 is adjusting itself to Billie, which would've probably resulted in a more memorable song. Kostenlos Spielen Com to Shirley's Promatic 2 efforts 'Goldfinger' and 'Diamonds Are Forever'this was a sadly forgettable theme.

Bond Songs Ranking Video

JAMES BOND 007 - theme songs ranking Sam Smith dürfte es mit seinem Song zu "Spectre" schwer haben, die Top10 der besten Bond-Songs zu knacken, die Konkurrenz ist einfach zu groß. CINEMA. Mein Ranking der Bond-Songs - Hier meine Rangliste der Titellieder zu den James-Bond-Filmen, vom besten bis zum schlechtesten. Es werden sicher so. Wie sich ihr Song in die Liste der besten Bond-Songs einreiht lest ihr hier. Jack White & Alicia Keys - Another Way To Die (). Die mit. Über die Jahrzehnte haben schon viele Künstler die Titelsongs der "James Bond​"-Reihe singen dürfen. Einige Bond-Songs wurden große Hits. Ranking: Die besten und die schlechtesten James-Bond-Songs. So viel können wir verraten: Madonna liegt in dieser Liste ziemlich weit hinten. Bond Songs Ranking Alice Coopers abgelehntes Lied zum Film war viel besser! Direkt zum Inhalt. Kommt dazu, dass er der Titeltrack des wohl ikonischsten Bond-Films aller Zeiten ist. Beste Spielothek in Unterrussenried finden bei einigen Songs die Interpreten gar nicht gekannt. Auf die Schnelle aus Versatzstücken zusammengebastelt von jemandem mit ADHS — so jedenfalls hört sich dieser Autounfall eines Songs an, mit seinen unnötig verkopften Schlagzeugbreaks. Für diese Funktion müssen sie in der Community angemeldet sein. Reise ins Ungewisse inklusive Rückflug. Bei Rang 20, Baroni: "optisch schöne Titelsequenz". Mein Kinojahr

I get the feeling that the Bond producers had the same dream, but they couldn't book him for the gig and instead got Here's another song in the catalog that takes all of the Bond cliches: big orchestra with swooning strings, a catchy tempo, and a big and bold vocal performance from Shirley Bassey.

This particular combo, however, is mostly unremarkable. From the most recent film in the series, the generally mediocre Spectre , Sam Smith's Oscar-winning tune is, well, just fine.

It really just sounds like a sad Sam Smith ballad. From Russia With Love is the second James Bond movie, and the first with an original song composed for the credits—although the opening credits went with a short acoustic rendition, with Matt Monro's vocal track playing over the end credits.

It's a nice song, but not a standout. Is it good? Yeah, I suppose. Years later, it feels like the song is overpowered by Adele herself, who at the time was coasting on the success of her record-breaking album Look, I get that it's fun and dancey and very Duran Duran, but I still have to say it's a missed opportunity not having A View to a Kill co-star Grace Jones singing this one.

Sheryl Crow is certainly an odd choice for a Bond song, especially since it doesn't really capture her general vibe as a solo artist the dripping strings do, however, bring to mind Bobbie Genty's "Ode to Billie Joe," a song Crow later covered.

But she nails the sultry vocals with a particularly '90s ennui. You get the sense that Crow doesn't really care either way what happens tomorrow.

Sure, it has all of the trappings of a treacly '80s love song the production is bloated with keyboards and backing vocals , but Knight still makes it sexy—and the video proves she can pull of a tux pretty well.

Jack White and Alicia Keyes's duet is the only two-hander in the film franchise, and the Quantum of Solace theme is one of the good true rock songs in the Bond catalog.

It's a great mix of White's goth-adjacent rock and Keyes's soulful voice. It works a lot better in practice than one would expect, but it's not exactly the most memorable Bond tune.

Garbage frontwoman Shirley Manson has the perfect voice for a Bond song, and "The World Is Not Enough" is one of the better-case scenarios when it comes to blending the typical Bond vibe with a rock band.

It's unfortunate, however, that—much like the film it represents—it's not exactly a standout in the franchise.

Tina Turner is a perfect choice for a bond theme song, and this one that accompanied Pierce Brosnan's debut as is slinky and sexy and reminiscent of Shirley Bassey's three songs.

While Turner's vocals aren't as powerful as Bassey's, her instrument blends well with the big orchestrations. And that it's both reminiscent of a classic Bond tune while also standing out as a '90s sex jam makes it the perfect combination.

There's a reason this one feels like an outlier among the other Bond tunes: While it was written by Bond composer John Barry, it wasn't used in the opening credits of On Her Majesty's Secret Service —which is often the most overlooked Bond film since it's the only one that starred actor George Lazenby.

This song feels more like a standard than any of the rest thanks to Louis Armstrong's iconic vocals. This might be a controversial placement, but I stand by it.

There is also a song by A-ha. What makes a Bond theme great? Moodiness helps. Sometimes strings, sometimes horns.

Almost always a bravura vocal performance. But what distinguishes the wheat from the chaff is a Bond theme song's ability to transcend its limited role as the accompaniment during the title sequence.

Great Bond theme songs can overshadow mediocre Bond movies, while mediocre Bond theme songs can start great Bond movies on the wrong foot.

They don't merely emulate John Barry's iconic instrumental theme, but they build off of it in dynamic, unexpected ways to create something both wholly original and complementary to the narrative of the debonair How does Eilish stack up against other theme songs from over nearly 60 years of Bond movie history?

Here's our ranking, from worst to best, of all the James Bond theme songs. No disrespect to Madge, but this just does not work at all.

As soon as the beat drops, things go off the rails, with Madonna's AutoTune-soaked vocals sounding more appropriate for a secret agent-themed America's Next Top Model episode rather than a blockbuster action movie.

When she whispers "Sigmund Freud," I can't stop my face from scrunching up in frustration. Points for creativity, but the guys from "Take On Me" are probably the strangest choice for a Bond theme on this list.

Too synthy, too tethered to what was in vogue at the time rather than opting for something more timeless. On paper, this song checks a lot of boxes.

Swanky horns? A swaggering vocal performance? That wah-wah secret agent guitar? It's there. But the whole tune comes off as unnecessarily hokey, especially with lyrics that are lacking any and all nuance.

The slowed-down interlude is the best part, but it lasts like 10 seconds. Tina Turner totally makes sense for a Bond theme, and she oozes nostalgia for the film's original era on this cut for Pierce Brosnan's debut as But the song never really There's no big finish to latch on to, no earworm chorus that digs in and has you humming long after you've finished.

It's also corny as hell. This also loses points because it sounds like a sorta-good Duran Duran song that just happened to be placed in a James Bond movie, as opposed to something that stretched the band to be more creative.

This attempt by the venerable Welsh belter fits the mold of a Bond theme, with blaring horns and minor-key, lounge singer panache.

It's simply unremarkable—not terrible, not great, ultimately forgettable when compared to other songs from this early Bond era. People love this jawn, and it's a staple on easy listening radio stations.

And don't get me wrong, it's a serviceable love song. But where's the danger? The intrigue? The sex? All I can think of when I listen to "All Time High" is those erectile dysfunction commercials where two Boomers hold hands in separate outdoor bathtubs while admiring a Sonoma sunset.

It just does nothing to prep me for a secret agent movie that's about to go down. Any Bond theme that prominently features smooth saxophone over a saucy trumpet is making a choice —and it's the wrong one.

It tugs at the heartstrings, is dynamically interesting, and is elegantly produced. It's just not a Bond song! It's too happy, too sweet, too major-key.

James Bond doesn't drive across country smiling to AM radio—he's over the legal limit and being pursued by some ridiculous foe. If a Bond theme song could function as a first dance song at a wedding, it's not really a Bond theme song.

The good parts about this song? It's gauzy, a clear throwback to classic Bond ballads. Sam Smith is adequately brooding to deliver it.

Also notable for being the only Bond song with a Tim Rice lyric sheet. Secondly, it has a killer central hook. So when former Soundgarden frontman Chris Cornell was chosen to lend his gravelly but precise vibrato to the theme song for Casino Royale co-written with David Arnold it was a chance to inject Bond with a bit of grunt.

For a noisy composition, it sounds strangely relaxed, oddly calm throughout. Cornell was a devastating vocalist with the right material, and there are moments here which allow him to open up and hint at the potential of a rock-led Bond theme.

Almost quite good. Sheryl Crow falls between these two extremes, aiming for the pout and simplicity of Nancy Sinatra, but also sticking a monster chorus into the mix as well.

And it is a good chorus, certainly: the final iteration, which arrives after a surprisingly tender and well-arranged string interlude, rescues it from mediocrity.

Adele, utterly spellbinding vocal talent that she is, basically whispers the whole song. And the subject — what is it about? Skyfall is… a mansion in the film?

Who sings a Bond song about a mansion? Or any kind of abode or dwelling? That immediate wash of strings is pure Bond atmosphere, a perfect encapsulation of the aesthetic, soundworld and grippingly cool style with which the spy was synonymous.

History-making in that, at 18, Eilish is the youngest musician to write and record a Bond theme — and she performed it at the Brit Awards with legendary composer Hans Zimmer.

There Feiertage Ostern Bayern Oscar-winning tunes among this batch, as well as chart-topping radio hits. Bassey's the Zahlungsnachweis of Bond for a reason, and this is the standout among her oeuvre. That voice! And then: Lulu. Shirley Manson singing Substratum Roadmap a Bond movie? It really just sounds like a sad Sam Smith ballad. How does Eilish stack up against other theme songs from over nearly 60 years of Bond movie history? Advertisement - Continue Reading Below. This song feels more like a standard than any of the rest thanks to Louis Bestes Brettspiel Aller Zeiten iconic vocals. Sam Smith — "Writing's on the Wall".